April 18, 2012 · Recipe · (No comments)

Ingredients:

  • shrimp, deveined
  • 1 T oil
  • 1 t salt
  • 1 t Chipotle chili powder
  • oil
  • corn tortillas

Cooking:

  1. Place all ingredients in a bowl. Marinate 10-15 minutes.
  2. Heat a saute pan. When hot, add shrimp and cook until just done.
  3. Heat about 1/2 inch of oil in a pan. When shimmering, add one tortilla. Lightly fry. Flip and continue to fry (about 1 minute total). Remove from oil and use tongs to fold into a taco shape. Repeat with remaining tortillas.
  4. Serve with curtido and guacamole.
April 18, 2012 · Recipe · 1 comment

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 3-4 T white wine vinegar
  • salt to taste
  • Optional: shredded carrot, chili flakes

Preparation:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Let sit for 1 hour to 2 days.
April 18, 2012 · Recipe · (No comments)

 

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 C long grain rice
  • 1 t butter
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 t lime juice
  • pinch of salt
  • 2.5 C chicken or vegetable broth
  • 1 T lime juice
  • 2 t sugar
  • 1/4 C cilantro

Cooking:

  1. Place rice, butter, garlic, 2 t lime juice, salt and broth in a stock pot (I just used a rice cooker). Boil. Reduce heat. Cover and simmer until rice is tender, about 15-20 minutes.
  2. Combine 2 T lime juice, sugar and cilantro. Add to rice while fluffing with a fork.
March 16, 2012 · Recipe · (No comments)

 

The other week an Italian-American friend described her plans for dinner. Broccoli rabe (she called it “wild broccoli”) is currently in the markets now. I have been buying it for it’s delicious bitter bite every chance I get. I had used it with spaghetti and garlic, in Thai Pad See Ew, stir-fried with chilis and ginger, and with pappardelle and sun-dried tomatoes. However, her meal of broccoli rabe risotto sounded better than anything I had come up with so far.

I eagerly waited through a few meals using up produce that was more time sensitive than the broccoli rabe, until, finally, it was time. To my dismay, I had been so focused on the broccoli rabe, I had forgotten to check my risotto supply. I had only about a quarter cup.

Thankfully a quick bit of research led me to substituting barley, which I had plenty of, for the arborio rice. I followed the same procedure as usual, adding sauteed broccoli rabe toward the end. The dish was wonderful. The barley had more bite and less starch than the arborio would have, but created a much lighter, warm weather friendly risotto. It worked so well that the next time I make risotto, I will need to put in some serious time deciding which grain to use.

Ingredients:

  • about 500g/1 lb broccoli rabe
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • 1-2 stalks of celery
  • 1 onion
  • 1/2 C white wine
  • 4-5 C broth (or water)- more may be needed
  • 1 C pearled barley
  • Butter
  • Parmesan
  • Salt  & Pepper

Preparation:

  1. Pull leaves off broccoli rabe stalks. Slice stalks into 1-2 cm pieces. Roughly chop leaves. Keep separate.
  2. Thinly slice 2 cloves of garlic.
  3. Mince remaining 2 cloves or garlic, onion and celery (I use a food processor).
  4. Heat broth to a simmer. Keep warm- cold broth will not cook the grain properly in the risotto.

 

Cooking:

  1. Heat a couple glugs of olive oil in a large pan. Add sliced garlic and saute until fragrant.
  2. Add broccoli rabe stalks and a sprinkle of salt. Saute until almost tender.
  3. Add broccoli rabe leaves and another sprinkle of salt. Saute until lightly wilted. Set aside.
  4. In a large sauce pan, heat a couple more glugs of olive oil. Add minced garlic, onion and celery. Saute until softened and just beginning to brown- about 8 minutes.
  5. Add barley and cook a few minutes until grain is translucent. Lower heat to medium-low.
  6. Add white wine and stir. Cook until wine is absorbed.
  7. Add about 1/2 a cup of hot broth. Stir and cook until broth is absorbed. Repeat this process (switching to water if necessary) until barley is nearly tender.
  8. When barley is almost cooked through (it should still have some bite), add the broccoli rabe. Season with salt and pepper.
  9. When risotto is finished (a bit loose in consistency- add more water or broth if necessary- and a little “toothsome”), through in a large slice of butter and some grated parmesan.

 

February 23, 2012 · Recipe · (No comments)

 

As a kid, cornbread was always one of my favorite foods to bake and to eat. Even today, I cannot eat beef stew without it and struggle through cornbreadless chili. The perfect cornbread is a little dense, moist and crumby but still holds up to dipping. Each time I make cornbread, I tend to use a different recipe- whatever I find quickly on the internet. However, after the last recipe I tried, I won’t make anything else.

I was skeptical about the recipe because the process was different from all others I have tried. Instead of mixing fat (usually oil) into the batter, this recipe called for melting a fat (I used butter) in a cast-iron skillet or baking dish in a preheated oven and then pouring the batter in. I thought that surely the cornbread would end up dry and to crumbly. I was wrong. It was crispy on the outside, moist and dense on the inside. Perfect and a new go-to recipe.

Original recipe from NY Times Diner’s Journal.

Ingredients
  • 4 tablespoons butter, olive oil, lard or bacon drippings
  • 1 1/2 cups medium-grind cornmeal
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/4 cups milk, more if needed

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 375F/190C. Put fat in a 10-inch cast-iron skillet or in an 8-inch square baking pan. Place pan in oven.
  2. Combine dry ingredients in a bowl. Mix eggs into milk, then stir this mixture into dry ingredients, combining with a few swift strokes. If mixture seems dry, add another tablespoon or two of milk.
  3. When fat and oven are hot, remove skillet or pan from oven, pour batter into it and smooth out top. Return pan to oven. Bake about 30 minutes, until top is lightly browned and sides have pulled away from pan; a toothpick inserted into center will come out clean.